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January 16th, 2018

3 short steps to cooperation heaven

As a parenting goal cooperation should be the bare minimum we’re aspiring to. And indeed we often have loftier ambitions for our children. I asked my class yesterday what qualities they’d like to see in their children when they were adults and they said they’d like their kids to have the following characteristics:

Confidence
Respectfulness
Hard working
Positivity
Empathy
Responsibility
Independence
Fun-loving
Mindfulness
Of course they wanted them to be happy and successful but the traits listed above were those that they thought would contribute to success and happiness.

We can encourage all of those qualities in our children but to do that we need to have a measure of cooperation. That doesn’t mean we don’t expect our children not to have feelings about what they need to do or want them to never express an opinion. (Although some parents have ruefully said they’d settle for some blind compliance.) But sometimes kids (and adults) need to do things they don’t particularly love doing. Of course as adults, with our more mature brains, we have greater perspective and ability to curb our impulses. Our ability to delay gratification and do something less palatable in the short term in the interest of a long term goal is greater than our children’s. (Maybe…)

It’s our job as parents to teach our children good habits that will last a lifetime. They need to do things like tidy their room or put their clothes in the laundry or brush their teeth or go to bed or do their homework or get off the computer or eat healthy food, which they may not see the point of. That’s why it’s our job. We need them to cooperate.

We all know that you can make a child do what they have to do using a stick approach. Maybe when you were a child you were threatened with punishments or withdrawal of privileges (also punishment) or were reprimanded and put down (punishment again) or even smacked (yep, punishment) if you didn’t do what you were told or expected to do. And you turned out alright. I’m sure you did. But you may nonetheless want to bring your children up in a different way.

And there are significant downsides to the stick approach. When a person holding a greater amount of power (the parent) uses that power to instill fear and to control the behaviour of a person with less power (the child) that is bullying. That’s not something we want to model for our children. When they think about it most parents agree that they want their children to grow up to be adults who, when faced with conflict, can use reason to persuade not just bludgeon others into their point of view. (Eg not Donald Trump.)

That doesn’t mean I’m advocating bribing your children to do what’s necessary for their own learning or for the good of the household. I’m talking about motivating your kids to want to do what you ask them to do. (Of course you need to ask them to do reasonable things for their own good not just get you a beer from the fridge when you’re watching TV.) Children have an evolved instinct to want their care-givers’ attention and approval. They want us to be pleased with them; they need it for their survival. I know it doesn’t always look like it but kids start off with a basic imperative to want to get things right and to please their parents. Though this can wane if their parents’ approval is not forthcoming.

So if we want our children’s cooperation one of the first things to work on connecting with them. Do you spend positive, fun time with your kids or is your time with them all about getting from A to B, doing homework, eating meals, doing chores and getting to bed? Do you end up nagging and chivvying or even shouting? If you don’t have a positive relationship there is less incentive for children to curb their own impulses to do what they want to do (difficult for their undeveloped rational brains) and instead do what makes us happy.

So let’s assume you’re prioritising spending positive times with them, playing, in conversation and doing things they like to do, not just ferrying them to enriching adult-directed extra-curricular activities. You’re giving them the message that you really enjoy their company. How else do you give your child the sense that you value them? Well, tell them. But don’t just say “you’re a great kid”. It has to be more descriptive than that to be credible. Instead appreciate them generally like: “I love it when you tell us stories about what happened at Scouts. You do a perfect impersonation of Akela. You really have observed the way he speaks very accurately.” Or “I was thinking of you today when I was walking the dog. I saw some daffodils just poking out of the ground and I was thinking that Spring is coming and how you love it when the flowers come out.” Or with more specific praise: “Thank you for remembering to feed the dog without me reminding you. You’re being very responsible about this dog.” “I know it’s hard for you to stop playing your new computer game when your time is up. It’s very compelling. It takes great self-control so well done.”

Against that backdrop it makes it much easier for you to influence your child. They are listening to you more. So when you have to ask them to do something use these 3 simple steps (simple to understand, not necessarily easy to do):

  1. Stop what you’re doing (put your phone down) and go to your child. (Don’t yell an instruction up the stairs.) Engage with him positively. When he looks at you descriptively praise him.
  2. Give the instruction in clear, simple, authoritative language, only ONCE. You can ask your child to tell you in their own words what it is they have to do but you can’t repeat it or he will get used to you repeating yourself over and over and it will become a nag.
  3. Stay in your child’s space and follow through. Empathise if they don’t want to do it and offer them a meaningful rationale for doing the task. Descriptively praise any small steps (and I mean small) in the right direction.

With these 3 steps you will be on your way to cooperation heaven.

 

 

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January 08th, 2018

4 things not to say to your kids this year

At The Parent Practice we usually like to focus on the positives. Not just because we’re a jolly little band but because it’s more effective for training. When we ask our kids to do things it’s more efficient to say what we want them to do rather than what we don’t want them to do. That’s because our brains conjure up images and they have a hard time processing negatives. So if I say ‘don’t think of pink elephants’ you will almost certainly be imagining a pink elephant. Likewise if you say to your child ‘don’t run inside’ he will be processing an image of himself running in the house. So instructions need to be positively framed. Instead say ‘walk inside’. Family rules also need to be positive for the added reason that lots of no’s feel very restrictive and may provoke rebellion. ‘Enjoy time on the computer after homework’  feels much less constraining than ‘No screen time unless homework is done.’

We also need to focus on the positives of what our children do because we get more of what we pay attention to. So if we notice and point out when they forget to hang up their towel or are mean to their sister but we don’t say anything when they put their book bag away or help unload the dishwasher then we can be sure to get more meanness and uncooperative behaviour. Children have evolved to do what gets their parents’ attention so we need to be careful what we prioritise with our words.

Another reason for positivity is that a positive connection between parent and child is the very best basis for discipline. Positive discipline teaches a child how to behave well rather than just not to get caught doing something wrong. It encourages self-discipline and the adoption of a set of values. Spending time with your kids doing fun things and letting them know how much you value them builds self-esteem and gives them a very strong incentive for accepting your influence.

But have you noticed that at this time of year with all the talk of resolutions how much they focus on negatives? How to get rid of excess pounds or drink less or spend less etc. While it’s not generally very motivating to focus on what we need to do less of there may be some merit in looking at some of the negative things we say in parenting so that we recognise them and can change. So many of the things that slip out of our mouths do so so automatically that we don’t even realise that we’re doing it.

So here are 4 things we shouldn’t say to our kids, what they sound like and why they kill connection: (before you read any further do realise that all parents have said these things –we’re human and we make mistakes but we’re trying to limit the number of mistakes we continue to make.)

  1. Criticism “Josh, you’ve forgotten your homework diary again! That’s the second time this week.” What we are trying to do as parents is use our words to encourage good behaviours and to build up a strong sense of self-worth. Criticism gives attention for the wrong things. Repeated criticism paints a picture of the child as not lovable, capable or worthwhile. It’s very easy to criticise without meaning to so we need positive practices to help us focus on positive behaviour. Keeping a pasta jar (in which we drop a pasta piece for every good behaviour) is a very useful tool. Notice when Josh remembers anything and acknowledge that as well as setting up systems to help him remember. 
  1. Personal attack “I am so DISAPPOINTED in you - I should have known better than to trust you.” This killer statement clearly communicates that the child does not have the approval that they crave. This is likely to lead to diminished self-worth and poor behaviour in future.  Some children grow up always seeking approval, sometimes by succumbing to peer pressure or getting involved in inappropriate sexual relationships. Even as adults some people seek approval through people -pleasing behaviours or in relentlessly pursuing qualifications or positions. Instead talk about how the behaviour, not the child, is disappointing and why. Explore how it happened non-judgmentally and what the child can do to rectify it. 
  1. Labels “You’re so mean! How could you say such things to Jake when you know he’s having a hard time settling in to his new school?” While teaching our children to be kind is part of our job as parents these labels only serve to paint a picture of the child as a mean person. Your child believes what you say and is very likely to act in accordance with this portrait. Instead explore what prompted the mean words since this will demonstrate the empathy you expect of your child. “When you say something like that it makes me wonder if you’re having a hard time with something yourself. Sometimes our pain comes out against those we care about….. What you said hurt Jake’s feelings. Now that you’re calmer perhaps you can think of something to make it up to him.” 
  1. Dismissing feelings “You’ll be fine, you’ll love it at camp.” “Don’t be such baby. You’re too old for this carry on now.” “You don’t hate your sister. That’s a terrible thing to say!” These statements tell our children that they cannot trust their own judgments about their emotions or that they shouldn’t have those emotions at all. This teaches kids to suppress their feelings. But feelings will come out. And they will usually be expressed in behaviour in the moment or later. Sometimes suppressed feelings can come out in physical symptoms such as eczema or stomach aches or headaches. A habit of suppressing feelings makes it difficult for adults to communicate their own needs or understand those of others and makes it unlikely that they will seek support when they need it. Dismissing your child’s feelings tells them that feelings don’t matter and that they don’t matter.

Phew! Now go hug your child and tell them why you love them!

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January 04th, 2018

5 New Year’s Resolutions to raise a global citizen in 2018

Guest Blog by Dina Shoukry Weston

Do you want to raise kind, empathetic kids who care about others and stand up for what is right? Of course you do, who wouldn’t?  Do you have time to do it? You’re probably thinking, “but when?” Well, here are 5 New Year’s Resolutions that can be incorporated into your daily life to raise socially aware global citizens or as I like to call them, KidCitizens! 

  1. Volunteer with your kids

Make giving part of your family’s everyday life by doing something for charity together in 2018. A Child Trends report showed that children who volunteer are more likely to have greater respect for others, leadership skills, and an understanding of citizenship that can carry on into adulthood. You don’t have to do anything overly complicated and you can do it with kids of any age from toddlers to teenagers. So whether you donate food to the local Food bank together, do a walk or run for a cause, hold a fundraising coffee morning or play date, or give money to a charity nominated by your kids, make sure you do something for charity with your children in 2018. If you are looking for ideas, check out these suggestions I prepared earlier! 

  1. Celebrate diversity

Our society is becoming increasingly diverse. Have a look at your street, your town, your city and you will see people from all walks of life who given the chance, could enrich our children’s outlook on life in so many ways. So in 2018, go out of your way to look for opportunities to celebrate diversity. One of the easiest ways to do this is to diversify your kids’ book collection. Look for books featuring character leads from a broad ethnic background or disabled characters. Visit as many cultural events, exhibitions, performances as you can. The Chinese New Year in February is an excellent opportunity to do this. If you have friends from a different religion or culture, ask if you can join in their celebrations. Last Diwali, my family and I celebrated with a dear Hindu friend and we had the most magical time. Or travel the globe from your home through kid friendly dishes from around the world. Celebrating diversity is fun and needn’t be taxing. 

  1. Go green

A Jordans Cereal survey revealed that more than one third of adults don’t have a clue about wildlife and can’t teach their kids about the great outdoors. Let’s reconnect our kids with nature in 2018. Head out to your local park. Don’t just make a beeline for the playground, but walk slowly there and talk about the different trees, leaves and insects. Make sure your kids are taking in what they see – the sights, smell and textures - so that they can truly appreciate their surroundings. Let them climb trees and play with sticks. Risky play is healthy and encourages independence and calculated risk taking – skills they will need their whole lives. At home, plant tomatoes or herbs together or buy a grow your own butterfly kit. Talk about recycling, using less water and conserving energy. None of this is rocket science and you probably do many of these things already, but how much time do you take to explain it to your kids? One of the things I am doing with my kids at the moment is saying no to plastic straws in restaurants, as they are so harmful to the environment. If we don’t teach our kids to appreciate nature, who is going to look after it in future? 

  1. Talk issues

The issues our society faces are difficult to explain to young children and in many ways, we don’t want to infringe on their innocence. However, whether we like it or not, our kids are exposed to society’s problems every day whether it’s at school or on TV. The truth is, there are many opportunities to talk about tricky issues and they shouldn't be treated as anything extra special. For example, you can talk race, religion, culture, disability, homelessness, gender equality, refugees and climate change on the walk to school, at the bus stop, at dinner, anytime really. The whole point is not to fixate or over explain but rather to talk about issues little and often in a natural environment so your kids don’t feel lectured and quite simply put off. Thankfully, there are books and resources online on pretty much any tricky issue to help you. So in 2018, really think about tackling issues with your kids, it will help them to understand and empathise with their community and their surroundings. 

  1. Be kind

Be visibly kind to others in front of your kids and they will be kind too. You can help a neighbor, write a thank you card to someone in the community, bake cupcakes together to cheer someone up, or simply say hello to someone you pass on the street. There are many things you can do and they don’t have to be grand gestures, just make sure you explain to your kids why you are doing them. I always ask my kids how it feels to do something kind, to which they always reply “good”. 

Finally, remember to pick your moments, kids are kids and if they aren’t in the mood for your lesson on global citizenship, then leave it and try again another day. Raising a global citizen should be fun and provide opportunities to bond as a family. 

For inspiration, tools and resources on how to raise a global citizen, check out KidCitizen on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter on @KidCitizenWand 

Dina Shoukry Weston is a Wandsworth mum; copywriter and founder of KidCitizen, a social media campaign helping parents empower their kid to make a positive impact on their community and their world.

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